Details about our Services

Trans Canada Pet Clinic

Veterinary Hospital

We offer caring and professional Veterinary services to:

Dryden, Vermilion Bay, Ignace,  Sioux Lookout,  Red Lake, Kenora, and surrounding communities.

807-223-5900

596 Government Street  Dryden, Ontario

Our Mission:  To provide exceptionally high quality patient care and client services with professionalism and compassion. We will accomplish this with highly skilled staff, latest veterinary technology, and outstanding client education.

Medical Services

Wellness and Vaccination Programs

Our wellness and vaccination programs are designed to prevent disease and prolong the lives of your companion animals. Disease prevention is always better and cost effective. An example would be the treatment of parvovirus. Parvovirus treatment can cost thousand dollar or more while vaccination against parvovirus will usually cost less than $95.

Puppy Wellness

Congratulations on your new puppy! Thank you for choosing TransCanada Pet Clinic to help protect and care for your new addition to your family.

Our puppy wellness program is designed to start on right path to a long and healthy life. The first few months of puppy age are critical for development of puppy. We can offer support and necessary tools to help her or him grow healthy dog, including information and advice on nutrition, deworming, training, socialization and behaviour.

Schedule your puppy for her / his first exam as soon as possible. Services include a series of examination and vaccination against, distemper, parainfluenza, hepatitis, parvovirus and rabies, etc. Until your puppy has received three series of vaccines, he or she is susceptible to many serious but preventable disease.

Your puppy will also need to be tested and treated for parasites, which are extremely common in young dogs. It is important for puppies to be treated for roundworms, not only to rid them of the infection but also to prevent you and the rest of your family from becoming infected. Roundworms are a zoonotic parasites, which means they can be transmitted from pets to people. By ensuring that your puppy is properly treated, you can keep your entire family safe from these and other parasites.

We look forward to meeting your new puppy!

Kitten Wellness

Congratulations on your new kitten! Thank you for choosing TransCanada Pet Clinic to help protect and care for your new addition to your family.

Our kitten wellness program is to get your kitten started on the right path to a long and healthy life. The first few months of kitten age are critical for development of kitten. We can offer support and necessary tools to help her or him grow healthy cat, including information and advice on nutrition, deworming, training, socialization and behaviour.

Schedule your kitten for his or her first exam as soon as possible. Until your kitten has received a series of vaccines, he or she is susceptible to many serious but preventable diseases. We will make sure your new pet is protected against rabies and panleukopenia (distemper). Depending on your cat’s risk, we may also advise vaccinating him or her against other diseases, such as feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). In addition, your kitten will need to be tested and treated for parasites, which are common in young cats.

Your kitten will also need to be tested and treated for parasites, which are extremely common in kitten. Most kittens have roundworms, which are intestinal worms that can cause coughing, weight loss, and a potbellied appearance in cats (although they may not cause any symptoms). It is important for kittens to be treated for roundworms, not only to get rid of the infection but also to prevent you and the rest of your family from becoming infected. Roundworms are a zoonotic parasite, which means they can be transmitted from pets to people. By ensuring that your kitten is properly treated, you can keep your entire family safe. Deworming in general strengthen their immune system too.

We look forward to meeting your new kitten!

Adult Pet Wellness

We provide wellness and diagnostic services for your adult pet including but not limited to: blood testing, fecal testing, and urine testing. As your personal yearly check up with your doctor is likely to include these tests and so should your pet’s yearly exam. Every year we detect many disease processes in apparently ‘normal’ adult animals. The results help us address problems in the early stages. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatments can result in your companion living a longer and healthier life.

Senior Pet Wellness

We recommend once your dog turns 7 years of age or your cat turns 8 years of age, they should undergo yearly senior wellness exam and diagnostic work-up. Even though you may believe your pet is healthy, there are many disease processes that do not show any clinical sign until the disease is quite advanced. More advanced diseases can be more difficult to treat and are not always as responsive to treatment as compared to diseases diagnosed early.

Early detection of disease and appropriate management/treatment can help to extend your pet’s life.

Spaying

Spaying / ovariohysterectomy is a surgical procedure performed on female dogs and cats to render them infertile. There are many benefits of spaying. First, you will contribute to the prevention of the dog and cat overpopulation. Second, spaying will eliminate the sometimes ‘messy’ heat cycles that attract male dogs to your house from miles away. Third, you will help prevent diseases in your pet such as pyometra (infection in the uterus) and mammary cancer. Spaying involves surgical removal of both ovaries and the uterus. It can be performed under a number of anesthetics and monitoring devices. If you are shopping around for a competitive price on this procedure, be sure to question the type of anesthetic used, pain control, the monitoring equipment and procedures followed.

Neutering

Neutering/ orchiectomy is a surgical procedure performed on male dogs and cats to render them infertile. There are many benefits of neutering. First, you will contribute to the prevention of the dog and cat overpopulation. Second, neutering will eliminate undesirable territorial marking with offensive urine odors and at times, embarrassing behavior in your male companion. Third, medical health benefits i.e. you will help prevent diseases in your pet such as prostate disease and testicular cancer.

Dentistry

According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, 80% of dogs and 70% of cats have oral disease by the age of 3. It is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in pets. Common signs of oral disease include tartar buildup, red and swollen gums, bad breath, changes in eating or chewing habits, pawing at the face and generalized depression.

Dental disease can affect other organs in the body: bacteria in the mouth can get into the bloodstream and may cause serious kidney infections, liver disease, lung disease, and heart valve disease. Oral disease can also indicate that another disease process is occurring elsewhere in a pet’s body. A thorough physical exam combined with appropriate laboratory work can determine if this is the case.

We can recommend and demonstrate preventative measures you can begin at home. Our wellness program emphasizes and explains how you can avoid costly dental procedures with your pet in the future.

Ask our team about your pet’s oral health care.

Anesthesia, monitoring and pain Management

For us it is extremely important that our patients remain safe during surgical procedures. Our veterinarians and veterinary staff are skilled in using anesthesia and monitoring patients to ensure their safety and provide the most comfortable experience. Anesthesia and patient monitoring vary greatly from clinic to clinic. You can be confident that we at TransCanada Pet Clinic use the most effective and up-to-date protocols. The type of anesthesia we use depends on the procedure. We closely monitor every procedure, regardless of whether it’s routine or more advanced.

General Anesthesia

For some procedures, we administer general anesthesia so that the patient remain unconscious and does not feel pain during the entire surgical procedure. Many pet owners worry about their pets being administered general anesthesia. We can assure you that modern anesthesia is generally quite safe; to further lower any risk, we perform a physical examination and we recommend running blood work ahead of time to catch any underlying health issues. In addition, we follow a specific anesthetic protocol, including monitoring vital signs during the procedure, to ensure the safety of our patients.

Pain Management and Control

We understand the issue of pain management is of great concern to pet owners today. We have a variety of medications available to manage your pet’s pain both before and after surgery and in the event of trauma. We would be pleased to discuss and recommend the available option depending on the condition and degree of pain experienced by your pet. Do not give your pet human pain medications/anti-inflammatories such as aspirin, tylenol, ibuprofen, etc. unless directed by your veterinarian, as often these medicines have more side effects than the benefits.

Non steroidal Anti-inflammatories

Non steroidal Anti-inflammatories are pain medication used for osteo arthritis, soft tissue injuries, and post operative pain control. These drugs are very good pain control medications and require monitoring of the renal, liver functions for safe long term use.

Tranquilization/Sedation

Tranquilization or sedation is used to calm an animal under various conditions. Pet owners frequently request sedation for their animals during travel, thunderstorms, fireworks, etc. Sedation and tranquilization are not without risk and each animal should be assessed prior to dispensing these medicines.

Local anesthesia/ Local blocks

We sometimes administer local anesthesia for minor procedures. Often it is used in combination with sedation to achieve good pain control during the procedure. Also local blocks for dental extractions.

Digital Radiology (X-rays)

Radiology (x-rays) is routinely used to provide valuable information about a pet’s bones, gastrointestinal tract (stomach, small intestines, and colon), respiratory tract (lungs), heart, and genitourinary system (bladder, prostate). It can be used alone or in conjunction with other diagnostic tools to provide a list of possible causes for a pet’s condition, identify the cause of a problem or rule out possible problems.

Good quality images are imperative for proper diagnosis / interpretation; it is important that the patient does not move during the process of radio graphing, therefore sometimes we need to sedate a patient that is in pain or scared or just simply too happy!

TransCanada Pet Clinic uses fully digital radiographic equipment that is a state-of-the-art, crystal clear images to render diagnoses. Our facility is equipped to get expert opinion by radiologists as well if needed.

Dermatology (Skin)

Skin disease is a frequently observed problem in dogs and cats. Diagnosing a skin problem in your pet may simply require an examination; however, some skin problems may require additional steps to obtain a diagnosis. Additional diagnostic procedures may include blood work, urinalysis, skin scraping, biopsies, etc.

Cardiology (Heart)

A heart problem can affect your pet at any age although it is more often found in older pets.Heart disease is a serious life threatening condition but early diagnosis and appropriate medication can extend and improve your pet’s life.

Many heart problems can be identified on physical examination. Additional tests are usually required to accurately identify the cause of the heart disease. Additional tests include EKGs (electrocardiograms), radiographs (X-rays), and ultrasounds. Animals suffering from congestive heart failure often experience difficulty breathing and frequent coughing.

Endocrinology (Hormones)

Endocrinology is the study of hormones and there are several common endocrine disorders found in dogs and cats. Hypothyroidism is often diagnosed in dogs. Hypothyroidism indicates low levels of circulating thyroid hormone. Cats are frequently diagnosed with high levels of circulating thyroid hormones.

Other common endocrine abnormalities include Cushing’s Disease and Addison’s Disease.

There is variety of clinical signs associated with endocrine disease. These signs include (but are not limited to) the following: abnormal energy levels, abnormal behavior, abnormal drinking, urinating and eating behavior, excessive panting, skin disorders, and weight gain or loss.

Medical Assessment

A complete medical assessment begins with a thorough physical examination whereby your pet’s eyes, ears, skin, cardiovascular, neurological, gastrointestinal and skeletal system are examined for any abnormalities. Blood tests can be performed as necessary to assess the proper functioning of your pet’s kidneys, liver, pancreas, and endocrine system including the thyroid gland and adrenal glands. Urine tests can detect similar problems. Depending on your pet’s condition, we may recommend further diagnostic tests such as radiography (X-rays), ultrasound or surgery.

Surgical Services

Soft Tissue Surgery

The most common soft tissue surgeries performed are lump /mass removal, Cystotomy removal of stones for urinary bladder. C-section, Gastrostomy, enterotomy (removal of foreign body from Gastro intestinal tract), laceration repair, Abscess flush and draining. Eye and ear surgeries.

Orthopaedic Surgery

Fracture repair using pinning, plating, external fixators, Cruciate surgeries, others. Please call the clinic for more information.

Nutritional Counseling

Animals have various nutritional requirements depending on their age, breed and health status. Decisions regarding your pet’s nutrition should not be made without first consulting a veterinarian. Geriatric animals have significantly different requirements than young growing puppies or kittens. Animals with diabetes or kidney disease also have different requirements. Please ask the veterinarian about dietary recommendation of your pet.

Exotics

Our veterinarians are experienced and facility is equipped to providing care and treatment for exotic companion animals, including rabbits, ferrets, gerbils, guinea pigs, hamsters, iguanas, and snakes. We understand their unique health needs and can provide diagnostic, therapeutic, and surgical services, as well as counseling on nutrition, behaviour, and general care.

Heartworm, Flea and Tick Control

A flea and tick problem on your pet means a flea problem in your home. Understanding the flea life cycle and methods for its control can be a daunting task. We can provide you with safe, effective flea & tick prevention and treatment.

Heartworm is one of the most lethal parasites that can affect our canine companions. If an infestation is undiagnosed and untreated it will prove fatal. Annually, heartworms infest millions of dogs in North America. In Ontario in 2010, 431 dogs tested positive for heartworm (and 3 cats, 2 coyotes and 2 foxes).

We being on the TransCanada highway with high flow of traffic from rest of the Ontario and Manitoba are in highly susceptible to heartworm disease.Prevention is obviously vastly preferable to treating a dog that is in heart failure produced by this parasite.

Adult heartworms live primarily within the heart chambers and large vessels of the heart or lungs of the dog. Everyday mature female worms release thousands of larvae called microfilariae into the bloodstream of an infected dog. Although these larvae can survive for years in circulation, they cannot develop to the adult form without an “intermediate host”. This intermediate host is the mosquito.

A mosquito bites an infected dog and ingests the microfilariae along with her blood meal. These larval worms then undergo two phases of maturity within the mosquito (this can take as little as 72 hours). The same mosquito then bites another dog and infects it with a new phase of the parasite.

This stage of larva can then develop into a mature heartworm in the infected dog. As these new larvae mature they circulate throughout the body within the blood vessels until they make their way to the vicinity of the heart, where they anchor to the wall of a heart chamber or a major vessel, and grow.

This two-stage life cycle is why heartworm can spread so quickly within an area. A positive dog will be a source of infection for any dogs in its area until that dog is tested and treated. Even a dog visiting the area can be a source of infection!

A recent pet study revealed that 69% of dog owners bring their pets with them when they travel, particularly the places which are tourist destinations. In addition many wildlife species can harbour heartworm, including foxes, wolves, coyotes and raccoons.

Once heartworm disease becomes established in local wildlife populations it becomes a permanent source of infection as these animals obviously cannot be diagnosed and treated. Cats can also contract heartworm disease although it is very rare in our climate and they will often recover from the infestation with no treatment at all.

You can read more about heartworm at Veterinary Partner.

POISONOUS PLANTS TO AVOID

There are a number of common plants which may be toxic to dogs and cats and should be avoided. These include: